Human Rights Watch Press Conf. to Report on Why Guinean Gov’t. is Stalling on Prosecution of Those Responsible for Sept. 28 Attack: Conakry, House of the Press, Wed. 12/5, 10AM

Sept. 28, 2009, two Guinean women try to find their relatives after massive attack by Guinea security services against opposition protesters..These women, as well as thousands of others, want justice which is long overdue..
Sept. 28, 2009, two Guinean women try to find their relatives after massive attack by Guinea security services against opposition protesters..These women, as well as thousands of others, want justice which is long overdue..

Once again, kudos to Human Rights Watch for staying on the case.

Invitation to a press conference


Guinea: Waiting for justice

It is necessary to bring before Guinean courts those responsible for the massacre, rape and other abuses perpetrated in the stadium 28 September 2009


Human Rights Watch is pleased to invite you to a press conference in Conakry, December 5, 2012 at 10:00 am to present a new report entitled Guinea “Waiting for justice.” In this report, Human Rights Watch examines the efforts by Guinea to bring to justice the perpetrators of crimes September 28, 2009. The report explores the reasons why justice is so important in the Guinean context and identifies some of the main factors that have contributed to the slow progress of the investigation of the September 28, 2009. In addition, the report establishes criteria that the government should meet to ensure that the perpetrators of the September 28, 2009 are brought to justice, and makes recommendations to key international actors, including the United Nations, the European Union, the United States and France to promote fair and credible proceedings against persons involved in crimes.


Subject: Launch of new report by Human Rights Watch


Speakers: Elise Keppler, senior lawyer at the International Justice Program at Human Rights Watch


With the participation of:
Christian Sow, Minister of Justice (Guest)


Asmaou Diallo, Presidente of the Association of victims, relatives and friends September 28, 2009, AVIPA


I Hamidou Barry Guinean Organisation for the Defence of Human Rights and the Citizen OGDH


Date and Time: Wednesday, December 5, 2012
10:00
Location: House of the Press


For more information, please contact:
In Conakry, Elise Keppler: +224-63-29-26-81 (portable) or kepplee@hrw.org

In Conakry, Marianna Enamoneta: +224-67-29-26-81 (portable) or enamonm@hrw.org
For other research conducted by Human Rights Watch on Guinea, please visit: http://www.hrw.org/fr/africa/guinea

*** Invitation à une conférence de presse ***

Guinée : En attente de justice

La nécessaire traduction devant les tribunaux guinéens des responsables du massacre, des viols et autres exactions perpétrés dans le stade le 28 septembre 2009

Human Rights Watch a le plaisir de vous inviter à une conférence de presse à Conakry, le 5 décembre 2012 à 10h00 afin de présenter son nouveau rapport Guinée intitulé « En attente de justice ». Dans le présent rapport, Human Rights Watch analyse les efforts déployés par la Guinée pour traduire en justice les auteurs des crimes perpétrés le 28 septembre 2009. Le rapport explore les raisons pour lesquelles la justice est si importante dans le contexte guinéen et identifie quelques-uns des principaux facteurs qui ont contribué à une lente progression de l’enquête du 28 septembre 2009. De plus, le rapport établit des critères que le gouvernement devrait satisfaire pour faire en sorte que les auteurs des crimes du 28 septembre 2009 soient traduits en justice, et formule des recommandations aux acteurs internationaux clés, notamment les Nations Unies, l’Union européenne, les États-Unis et la France afin de promouvoir des poursuites équitables et crédibles à l’encontre des personnes impliquées dans des crimes.

Sujet: Lancement du nouveau rapport de Human Rights Watch

Intervenants: Elise Keppler, juriste senior au Programme de Justice internationale de Human Rights Watch

Avec la participation de :

Christian Sow, Ministre de la Justice (Invité)

Asmaou Diallo, Presidente de l’Association des victimes, parents et amis

du 28 septembre 2009, AVIPA

Me Hamidou Barry, Organisation guinéenne de défense des droits de l’homme et du citoyen, OGDH

Date et heure: Mercredi 5 décembre, 2012

10h00

Lieu: Maison de la presse

Pour plus d’informations, veuillez contacter:

À Conakry, Elise Keppler: +224-63-29-26-81 (portable); ou kepplee@hrw.org

À Conakry, Marianna Enamoneta: +224-67-29-26-81 (portable); ou enamonm@hrw.org

Pour consulter d’autres recherches effectuées par Human Rights Watch sur la Guinée, veuillez consulter : http://www.hrw.org/fr/africa/guinea

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Guinea Gov’t. Re-Shuffle Has Fingerprints of Int’l Community All Over it, Especially the Elysee Palace

The international community’s policy towards Guinea is straightforward: at all costs, the huge Guinean army must be prevented from rearing its ugly head and scaring away investors. In the 2010 presidential election, Conde, a Malinke, was deemed the person who could best prevent a coup by a largely Malinke army. Beyond that, the international community, which installed Conde in the presidency, has placed few constraints on him.

But now, the international community, anxious to close the deal on Guinea’s “democratic” transition by pressing for legislative elections, is watching Conde nervously. By Conde giving his security forces shoot-to-kill orders during peaceful demonstrations, making anti-Peul politics the center of his government policy, striking shady mining deals while courting mysterious loans, and relentlessly jerking the opposition around, when combined, scream for a presidential makeover. When you add Guinea’s refusal to pursue prosecutions for the September 28, 2009, massacre and the issuance of a UN statement this past September 28, that “political rape goes unpunished in Guinea,” the makeover becomes mandatory.

Unfortunately, the makeover is not designed to improve governance, rather it is a mechanism the international community will use to express its confidence that Guinean legislative elections will be “free and fair” and to ensure broad acceptance of the results, even if they are fraudulent, as was the case in the 2010 presidential election.

Who is capable of transforming Conde over the next few months? The answer is simple: Guinea’s former colonial ruler, France. This is the country where Conde lived for 59 years, this is the country where Conde met his good friend, Bernard Kouchner, the former foreign minister, and this is the country without which there would be no Organization of the International Francophonie which, with Kouchner at the forefront, orchestrated Conde’s “win” of the 2010 presidential election.

The first stage of Conde’s makeover is the re-shuffle of his cabinet. France’s prescription for the new cabinet is simple: get rid of the military uniforms sitting at the table in cabinet meetings and create a human rights ministry. The media are full of analyses of the re-shuffle of the Guinean government, much of it suggesting that Conde has fully embraced “democracy,” and that his government re-shuffle is proof. After two years with Conde at the helm of the country, journalists should know that Conde doesn’t do the right thing unless forced from the outside and, even then, he makes sure it is done in a way that is advantageous for him only.

Conde’s ridding the cabinet of the military is nothing more than an impressive swindle. He removed three senior military officers, which allows him to bill his government as “civilian,” which the media and the international community will translate as “democratic.” But two military officers remain in his government who are the primary perpetrators of the September 28, 2009, massacre. Claude Pivi, is the Minister for Presidential Security, but the new cabinet roster does not show his name nor list his position. And, Moussa Tiegboro Camara, technically not a cabinet member, but his czar-like responsibilities for drug enforcement, organized crime, and terrorism, ensure him a seat at cabinet meetings. Neither Pivi nor Camara were dumped in the re-shuffle. International human rights organizations have been banging Conde about Pivi and Camara, yet nothing is likely to change. Both men are from the ruling military junta of 2008-2009 and former interim president Sekouba Konate is rumored to have told Conde to make room for them in his government.

The second cabinet swindle is the establishment of a human rights ministry. After Conde clearly stated at a Washington meeting in 2011, in response to a question about human rights, that he was the president, not the head of human rights, it is clear this issue is not high on his agenda. Given that it is 2012 and almost every leader, good or bad, has a human rights office or ministry, Conde can no longer buck the idea of creating one. But, hold your applause because, just like other leaders who don’t give a damn about human rights, Conde has found a self-serving use for the new ministry. It will be nothing more than a repository for human rights complaints, which should fill very quickly given Guinea’s long-standing history of repression, and where the complaints will never see the light of day. Conde is using the same method to the September 28 massacre investigation and prosecutions by keeping the issue buried deep in the bowels of the Guinean judicial system.

But, this is not the end of Conde’s political makeover. In the next post, a bit of analysis about that near-love letter French president Hollande sent to Conde on the occasion of the anniversary of Guinea’s independence.

Stay tuned!

Use UN Statement on Political Rape in Guinea to Get Case Transferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC)

Yesterday, on the third anniversary of the massacre and rape of Guinean citizens by members of Guinea’s ruling junta, the people received some good news from the United Nations. Zainab Bangura, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Sexual Violence in Conflict, issued a declaration that told the world something Guineans have known all along. That is, Guinea’s lack of progress on the case is the result of pervasive impunity of Alpha Conde’s administration.

After three years of pretending to investigate this case, the Guinean court system has fulfilled the criteria which allow cases to be transferred from the country of origin to the International Criminal Court: a country must demonstrate that it is unwilling or unable to prosecute. We know that three years ago Guinea was unwilling to prosecute largely because an investigation would unravel the involvement of former and present government officials in the attack, including Alpha Conde, himself. As for being unable to try the case, let’s just say the court system is not a model of judicial independence. While Ms.Bangura is not in a position to demand the transfer of this case to the ICC, she is ringing a loud bell. Those determined to get justice for the victims should take the bell and ring it loudly in the Hague at Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda’s door. After all, she was one of the first international investigators to come to Guinea to investigate the massacre in February 2010 and she said, before she left, that crimes against humanity had taken place. Alpha Conde’s administration will sit on this case for as long as it can and will try every trick in the book to prevent it leaving Guinea. This is the time for a full court press. Justice delayed is justice denied.

Zainab Bangura

Statement by Special Representative of the Secretary-General
on Sexual Violence in Conflict, Zainab Bangura

GUINEA-CONAKRY: POLITICAL RAPE REMAINS UNPUNISHED
(New York, 28 September 2012)

Three years ago today, the atrocities committed against peaceful protesters by security forces in Guinea-Conakry shocked the world. Women were particular targets of the violence. Public rapes and gang-rapes of women in broad daylight dramatically showed that sexual violence is not only a weapon in times of war. Whether it serves as a tactic of conflict or part of the repertoire of political repression, the intent is the same: to humiliate, silence, intimidate and punish the victims.

The International Commission of Inquiry on the 28 September 2009 events in Guinea verified that in addition to the massacre of at least 150 unarmed protesters, no less than 109 women suffered rape and other forms of sexual abuse. According to the International Commission of Inquiry, these widespread and systematic attacks could constitute crimes against humanity.

I welcome the indictment, announced earlier this month, of Colonel Abdoulaye Chérif Diaby, former Minister of Health in the Moussa Dadis Camara government, for his alleged responsibility in the 28 September 2009 events. It is important that these and other charges are processed swiftly and thoroughly, as justice in Guinea has already been delayed for too long. Although Lieutenant Colonel Moussa Tiegboro Camara earlier this year was charged for his role in the massacre, to date not a single perpetrator has been convicted.

Last November, my predecessor visited Guinea to meet with rape survivors, representatives of victims associations, and government officials. A Joint Communiqué was agreed between the government of Guinea and the United Nations, clearly stating the government’s commitment to fight impunity and ultimately prevent and deter sexual violence. The Joint Communiqué also welcomed the assistance of the Team of Experts on the Rule of Law / Sexual Violence in Conflict to support the Panel of Judges in Guinea, created to lead national investigations into the 2009 incidents. The Team of Experts is currently engaged in discussions with the national authorities to deploy an expert on sexual violence, and I want to encourage the government of Guinea to facilitate this deployment as soon as possible.

There is an urgent need to assist the survivors and bring the remaining perpetrators to justice. It is equally crucial that all victims, other witnesses and their families are afforded full protection and that no effort is spared to ensure their safety throughout this process. Known abusers must not be allowed to hold positions of authority.

Addressing these atrocities is crucial for fostering reconciliation, for trust in the justice system, and for a durable peace. We are committed to supporting the government’s efforts to address impunity for sexual violence and to ensuring that such atrocities are never repeated. We will continue to monitor the situation in Guinea-Conakry and anywhere else that sexual violence may occur.

POTTAL-FII-BHANTAL FOUTAH-DJALLON USA: Massacre of September 28th, 2009. Three Years of Impunity!

MEMORANDUM OF POTTAL-FII-BHANTAL FOUTA-DJALlON

MASSACRE OF SEPTEMBER 28th, 2009.  THREE YEARS OF IMPUNITY!

Three years after the military junta-sponsored massacre at the opposition rally in Guinea in which victims were ethnically targeted, nearly 200 people were brutally murdered and at least 100 women were viciously raped in broad daylight, we are gathered here, at the United Nations Plaza, once again. We could easily read aloud the statement we produced last year because no progress has been made in holding accountable those who are accused of these crimes. This lack of progress is due to the impunity exercised within the government of Alpha Conde.

Much to the shock of Guineans and human rights groups, Mr. Conde protects and rewards the military officers accused of the crimes by appointing two of the primary perpetrators to his cabinet. Further, neither ECOWAS nor the Guinean government has taken a deposition from the primary mastermind of the massacre, Capt. Dadis Camara, now living in Burkina Faso. It is becoming more and more obvious that the Guinean government is determined not to prosecute the September 28 crimes. Given that Guinea has clearly demonstrated that it is unwilling and unable to prosecute the case, help from the international community is needed to get the case transferred to the International Criminal Court as soon as possible.

Justice delayed is justice denied. Justice for victims of the September 28 massacres is our primary goal. At the same time we must work to ensure that the people of Guinea never experience such a travesty again. While Mr. Alpha Conde was not at the helm when the September 28 massacre took place, his refusal to investigate and prosecute those responsible is only one example of the impunity with which he governs. This impunity, combined with undemocratic practices and ethnically-based policies, has resulted in illegal mass arrests, indefinite incarcerations, torture and extra-judicial killings. The dangers posed by Alpha Conde are on par to that of the military junta which committed the massacre.

The threat of genocide in Guinea is palpable. Genocide does not happen overnight. It builds up over a long period, with social exclusion, ethnic militia and paramilitary forces, political stalemate and pervasive corruption in a climate of economic hardships. All these conditions are at work in Guinea, silently gripping our country. No nations, no international institutions could claim ignorance about the ominous future that Guinea faces. Short of drastic and proactive measures, the country will continue its slide toward chaos, threatening, in the process, the stability of the whole West-Africa.

Today, we want to use this solemn occasion to put the Guinean government on notice that we WILL get justice for the victims and, in order to prevent another massacre, we will continue the pressure on Mr. Alpha Conde and his administration with intensity.

For the last 3 years, Pottal-Fii-Bhantal has worked relentlessly toward that end. Through our work, we have enjoyed tremendous support from Guinean citizens who, more than ever, are aware of the necessity of eradicating impunity if Guinea is to pull herself out of a legacy of totalitarian and military rule.

Today is an opportunity to remind all of us that there is no nobler fight than setting our country on the path of justice as a prerequisite for democracy. We are encouraged that Guinean citizens of all walks of life, ethnic backgrounds and political opinions are mobilized to honor the victims by pledging to never give up the fight to ensure that those responsible are prosecuted. We have been also honored by the benevolent support of activists, civil right leaders, civil servants of foreign governments as well as staff of international human rights and development agencies. We thank them from the bottom of our hearts in the name of the voiceless victims and their families in Guinea and around the world.

Pottal-Fii-Bhantal is calling on all segments of the Guinean population to mobilize in order avert the dangerous prospects hanging over our country. We encourage Guineans citizens to pursue all legal means of opposing a new dictatorship in our country. We are calling on the international community not look the other way, as it has done in last 50 years, while a tragedy is being prepared in our country. Given Guinea’s political legacy, the involvement of the international community is crucial for the country to be a true “emerging democracy”.

As we did last year, Pottal Fii-Bhantal is calling on all constituencies interested in building justice as a foundation for a genuine democracy in Guinea, to unite around the crucial program of fighting impunity and continue the pressures on the Guinean authorities.

To those who are living with the scars of the violence inflicted upon them, we are ensuring our unwavering support. We pray to All Mighty God to have mercy on the souls of those who have lost their lives for the emergence of democracy in Guinea.

Three years after the military junta-sponsored massacre at the opposition rally in Guinea in which victims were ethnically targeted, nearly 200 people were brutally murdered and at least 100 women were viciously raped in broad daylight, we are gathered here, at the United Nations Plaza, once again. We could easily read aloud the statement we produced last year because no progress has been made in holding accountable those who are accused of these crimes. This lack of progress is due to the impunity exercised within the government of Alpha Conde.

Much to the shock of Guineans and human rights groups, Mr. Conde protects and rewards the military officers accused of the crimes by appointing two of the primary perpetrators to his cabinet. Further, neither ECOWAS nor the Guinean government has taken a deposition from the primary mastermind of the massacre, Capt. Dadis Camara, now living in Burkina Faso. It is becoming more and more obvious that the Guinean government is determined not to prosecute the September 28 crimes. Given that Guinea has clearly demonstrated that it is unwilling and unable to prosecute the case, help from the international community is needed to get the case transferred to the International Criminal Court as soon as possible.

Justice delayed is justice denied. Justice for victims of the September 28 massacres is our primary goal. At the same time we must work to ensure that the people of Guinea never experience such a travesty again. While Mr. Alpha Conde was not at the helm when the September 28 massacre took place, his refusal to investigate and prosecute those responsible is only one example of the impunity with which he governs. This impunity, combined with undemocratic practices and ethnically-based policies, has resulted in illegal mass arrests, indefinite incarcerations, torture and extra-judicial killings. The dangers posed by Alpha Conde are on par to that of the military junta which committed the massacre.

The threat of genocide in Guinea is palpable. Genocide does not happen overnight. It builds up over a long period, with social exclusion, ethnic militia and paramilitary forces, political stalemate and pervasive corruption in a climate of economic hardships. All these conditions are at work in Guinea, silently gripping our country. No nations, no international institutions could claim ignorance about the ominous future that Guinea faces. Short of drastic and proactive measures, the country will continue its slide toward chaos, threatening, in the process, the stability of the whole West-Africa.

Today, we want to use this solemn occasion to put the Guinean government on notice that we WILL get justice for the victims and, in order to prevent another massacre, we will continue the pressure on Mr. Alpha Conde and his administration with intensity.

For the last 3 years, Pottal-Fii-Bhantal has worked relentlessly toward that end. Through our work, we have enjoyed tremendous support from Guinean citizens who, more than ever, are aware of the necessity of eradicating impunity if Guinea is to pull herself out of a legacy of totalitarian and military rule.

Today is an opportunity to remind all of us that there is no nobler fight than setting our country on the path of justice as a prerequisite for democracy. We are encouraged that Guinean citizens of all walks of life, ethnic backgrounds and political opinions are mobilized to honor the victims by pledging to never give up the fight to ensure that those responsible are prosecuted. We have been also honored by the benevolent support of activists, civil right leaders, civil servants of foreign governments as well as staff of international human rights and development agencies. We thank them from the bottom of our hearts in the name of the voiceless victims and their families in Guinea and around the world.

Pottal-Fii-Bhantal is calling on all segments of the Guinean population to mobilize in order avert the dangerous prospects hanging over our country. We encourage Guineans citizens to pursue all legal means of opposing a new dictatorship in our country. We are calling on the international community not look the other way, as it has done in last 50 years, while a tragedy is being prepared in our country. Given Guinea’s political legacy, the involvement of the international community is crucial for the country to be a true “emerging democracy”.

As we did last year, Pottal Fii-Bhantal is calling on all constituencies interested in building justice as a foundation for a genuine democracy in Guinea, to unite around the crucial program of fighting impunity and continue the pressures on the Guinean authorities.

To those who are living with the scars of the violence inflicted upon them, we are ensuring our unwavering support. We pray to All Mighty God to have mercy on the souls of those who have lost their lives for the emergence of democracy in Guinea.

Three years after the military junta-sponsored massacre at the opposition rally in Guinea in which victims were ethnically targeted, nearly 200 people were brutally murdered and at least 100 women were viciously raped in broad daylight, we are gathered here, at the United Nations Plaza, once again. We could easily read aloud the statement we produced last year because no progress has been made in holding accountable those who are accused of these crimes. This lack of progress is due to the impunity exercised within the government of Alpha Conde.

Much to the shock of Guineans and human rights groups, Mr. Conde protects and rewards the military officers accused of the crimes by appointing two of the primary perpetrators to his cabinet. Further, neither ECOWAS nor the Guinean government has taken a deposition from the primary mastermind of the massacre, Capt. Dadis Camara, now living in Burkina Faso. It is becoming more and more obvious that the Guinean government is determined not to prosecute the September 28 crimes. Given that Guinea has clearly demonstrated that it is unwilling and unable to prosecute the case, help from the international community is needed to get the case transferred to the International Criminal Court as soon as possible.

Justice delayed is justice denied. Justice for victims of the September 28 massacres is our primary goal. At the same time we must work to ensure that the people of Guinea never experience such a travesty again. While Mr. Alpha Conde was not at the helm when the September 28 massacre took place, his refusal to investigate and prosecute those responsible is only one example of the impunity with which he governs. This impunity, combined with undemocratic practices and ethnically-based policies, has resulted in illegal mass arrests, indefinite incarcerations, torture and extra-judicial killings. The dangers posed by Alpha Conde are on par to that of the military junta which committed the massacre.

The threat of genocide in Guinea is palpable. Genocide does not happen overnight. It builds up over a long period, with social exclusion, ethnic militia and paramilitary forces, political stalemate and pervasive corruption in a climate of economic hardships. All these conditions are at work in Guinea, silently gripping our country. No nations, no international institutions could claim ignorance about the ominous future that Guinea faces. Short of drastic and proactive measures, the country will continue its slide toward chaos, threatening, in the process, the stability of the whole West-Africa.

Today, we want to use this solemn occasion to put the Guinean government on notice that we WILL get justice for the victims and, in order to prevent another massacre, we will continue the pressure on Mr. Alpha Conde and his administration with intensity.

For the last 3 years, Pottal-Fii-Bhantal has worked relentlessly toward that end. Through our work, we have enjoyed tremendous support from Guinean citizens who, more than ever, are aware of the necessity of eradicating impunity if Guinea is to pull herself out of a legacy of totalitarian and military rule.

Today is an opportunity to remind all of us that there is no nobler fight than setting our country on the path of justice as a prerequisite for democracy. We are encouraged that Guinean citizens of all walks of life, ethnic backgrounds and political opinions are mobilized to honor the victims by pledging to never give up the fight to ensure that those responsible are prosecuted. We have been also honored by the benevolent support of activists, civil right leaders, civil servants of foreign governments as well as staff of international human rights and development agencies. We thank them from the bottom of our hearts in the name of the voiceless victims and their families in Guinea and around the world.

Pottal-Fii-Bhantal is calling on all segments of the Guinean population to mobilize in order avert the dangerous prospects hanging over our country. We encourage Guineans citizens to pursue all legal means of opposing a new dictatorship in our country. We are calling on the international community not look the other way, as it has done in last 50 years, while a tragedy is being prepared in our country. Given Guinea’s political legacy, the involvement of the international community is crucial for the country to be a true “emerging democracy”.

As we did last year, Pottal Fii-Bhantal is calling on all constituencies interested in building justice as a foundation for a genuine democracy in Guinea, to unite around the crucial program of fighting impunity and continue the pressures on the Guinean authorities.

To those who are living with the scars of the violence inflicted upon them, we are ensuring our unwavering support. We pray to All Mighty God to have mercy on the souls of those who have lost their lives for the emergence of democracy in Guinea.

The Board of Pottal-Fii-Bhantal Fouta-Djallon – USA

Pottal-Fii-Bhantal Fouta Djallon Organizes Sept. 28 NY March of Remembrnce and Protest on Third Anniversary of the State-Sponsored Massacre of Guinean Opposition Supporters

SEPT. 28, 2009:  Two women search desperately for news of loved ones who attended the opposition rally at the Sept. 28 stadium where state-sponsored security forces attacked participants.  Many relatives did find their loved ones — at the morgue.  In addition, over 100 women were brutally raped by security forces which specifically targeted them because of their Peul ethnicity.

New York, September 17th, 2012

Pottal-Fii-Bhantal Fouta Djallon has organized a march of remembrance and protest to be held on Friday, September 28, 2012 in New York. The march will begin at 10:00 am at the diplomatic representation of Guinea and end at the United Nations – Plaza of Nations.

On 28 September 2009, security forces in the Republic of Guinea-Conakry shocked the world by despicable acts of rape of over 80 women and the killing of more than 150 people in broad daylight. Since the massacre, the political climate in Guinea has deteriorated due to the impunity enjoyed by the agents of the security forces suspected of committing these crimes.

Pottal Fii-Bhantal Fouta Djallon is an advocacy group that works for the defense of human rights in Guinea. One of the objectives of the march is raising awareness of international organizations within the United Nations regarding the danger of repeated violations of human rights in Guinea and the climate of impunity maintained by the government after the last presidential election. The inauguration of President Alpha Condé of Guinea was supposed to pave the way for democracy. This hope has been ruined today because of the Government’s refusal to continue the investigation of crimes against humanity, its open support of the perpetrators of these crimes and its continuous and deliberate attacks by state security forces against political opponents, media, specific ethnic groups and regular citizens.

Another objective of the march is to send a clear message to international development and human rights organizations about the role that should be theirs to avoid political chaos in Guinea. Policies of ethnic exclusion and the Government’s provocative measures have the potential to destabilize Guinea; this will have dangerous consequences for the population and sub-region of West Africa, which is struggling to recover from wars in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Cote d’Ivoire.

For more information on the human rights situation in Guinea consult Human Rights Watch report, “Bloody Monday”, massacre on 28 September 2009 by the security forces of the government www.hrw.org/node/87190.

The website JUSTICE IN GUINEA, http://www.justiceinguinea.org and website of Pottal-Fii-Bhantal Fouta Djallon, www.pottalfiibhantal.org provide information on violations of human rights, repression and ongoing actions to bring justice to the people of Guinea.

Press Liaisons:

  • Aissatou Bah: 240-632-1187
  • Abdourahmane Barry : 484-614-4542
  • Aissatou Bobo Diallo: 646-750-1411

Guinea Update 9-17: CNT Passes Law Governing CENI|9-20 National Opp. March|9-28-09 Massacre Marches in NY and Paris|Diallo Receives Homecoming Worthy of a President (Pics)

CNT Passes Law Governing the Electoral Council, CENI

[Below is a Google translation into English, the highlighted link will take you to the original article in French.]

Politics: CNT adopted a new law on the INEC!

posted September 17 at 24:53 | updated 17 September 12:57 | 739 times displayed

The National Transitional Council has adopted this Monday, September 17, 2012 plenary Organic Law on the Independent National Electoral Commission INEC. Of the 120 members present, only four people abstained giving a virtual plebiscite on the new law.
Parity between the movement and the opposition
If the joint composition of INEC was maintained ie ten persons appointed by the presidential, ten persons appointed by the opposition, three people from civil society and two others by the administration (Ed.note, “administration ” refers to the Ministry of Territorial Administration and  Decentralization, essentially the Interior ministry) the centrists were superbly ignored by the new law.
According to the explanatory memorandum read by the rapporteur of the Committee on the bottom, Mr. Traoré, the CNT justifies the exclusion of centrist parties relying on Article 3, paragraph 4 of the Constitution which provides that “the rights political parties of the opposition to oppose by legal action from the government and propose alternatives are secured. ” Accordingly, adds Mr Traoré, “the NTC can not legislate the INEC that given two groups of parties: those who support the government action and those which the Constitution recognizes the right to oppose by legal means. Between the two groups, legally it could not find a place “centrism”.
Innovations of the new organic law.
The law adopted today provides a seven-year term non-renewable members of INEC, while the old law was silent on this issue.
For guaranteed not to paralyze the INEC, the legislature drafted Article 7 of the new law as follows: “non member designation (s) by (note the movement, the opposition, civil society and administration) within ten clear days, can not interfere with the installation and operation of INEC. However, the part that does not make the appointment (….) retains its right of appointment for the duration of the current term.
To ensure the independence of the members of INEC, Article 8, paragraph 3 states: “In the exercise of their duties, members of INEC shall not seek or receive instructions or orders of any public or private authority, including their original structure.
The office of Chairman of INEC is reserved exclusively for civil society who can be elected by an absolute majority on the first ballot and a relative majority in the second round.
Finally, given all the rumors of embezzlement that the electoral institution has known, the new law provides that “in the performance of its operating budget, INEC conducts at least once a year, an internal audit to ensure the correct application of the rules in force fiscal management. ” At the request of the government or financial and technical partners, the organization is also subject to an external audit.

Nationwide Opposition March, September 20

The opposition plans to hold a peaceful march on Thursday, September 20 in Conakry with similar marches to be held in all the prefectures throughout the country. The opposition was to have held a press conference today to specify details for the march but no word as of now. When more information becomes available, Guinea Oye! will report it.

Marches of Remembrance and Protest Regarding September 28, 2009 Massacre of Peaceful Opposition Supporters

The New York march will be held on Friday, September 28, 2012 and is sponsored by Pottal-Fii-Bhantal Fouta Djallon. Details will be provided shortly.

Below, please find details (en francais) for the Paris march which will be held on Saturday, September 29.

Journée de commémoration à Paris du massacre du 28 septembre 2009 de Conakry

« La Justice en Guinée maintenant»

Les organisations guinéennes de la Société Civile en France, ainsi que LES ASSOCIATIONS GUINEENNES DE DEFENSES DES VICTIMES DE REPRESSIONS A CARACTERE POLITIQUE, convient tous les guinéens de France, d’Europe et les amis de la Guinée à la Grande Journée de Commémoration du massacre du 28 septembre 2009 qu’elles organisent, le samedi 29 septembre 2012 de 13h à 18h au 6 avenue Maurice Ravel Paris 75012.

Lieu de la rencontre :

6, avenue Maurice Ravel75012 PARIS

Quartier : Bercy – Gare de Lyon – Porte de Vincennes

Voiture : Porte de Vincennes

Bus : 29, 56, PC2, 351 ; Métro 1 : Arrêt Porte De Vincennes

En effet, cela fait déjà 3 ans depuis que la Guinée, a été endeuillée par le massacre de 157 militants pacifiques des Partis d’opposition, de milliers de militants blessés et de centaines de femmes violées. Mais depuis ce 28 septembre 2009, les familles des victimes attendent qu’une justice soit faite.

Ce 3ème anniversaire du massacre du 28 septembre 2009 doit marquer le véritable début du combat contre l’impunité en Guinée, des annonces seront faites dans ce sens.

Cette journée de Commémoration permettra de réveiller la mémoire collective guinéenne, de remettre la question de la justice et la fin de la culture de l’impunité dans le combat pour une Guinée Libre, Unie et Démocratique.

A travers cette journée de commémoration, des témoins vont s’exprimer sur ces évènements douloureux, des personnalités guinéennes et autres vont intervenir sur des thèmes relatifs à la justice en Guinée et enfin, un passage en revue des différentes procédures judiciaires en cours en Guinée, en Europe et aux Etats-Unis sera présenté.

Tous les guinéens et amis de la Guinée sont invités à participer à ce grand moment d’émotions et de recueillement à l’hommage des martyres du 28 septembre 2009 à Conakry.

La Commission d’organisation de la Journée de Commémoration

du massacre du 28 septembre 2009 en Guinée

Contacts : 06 51 77 69 99 / 06 65 56 58 28

Cellou Dalein Diallo Recieves a Homecoming Worthy of a President . . .

After Diallo’s trip to the US to observe the Democratic convention, his visit with supporters in New York and Washington, and his visits in Paris, he returned to Conakry on Sunday to a massive reception by his supporters. The crowd was so huge, one could not be faulted for thinking the president had returned. Of course, Diallo would have been the president at the end of the first round of the 2010 election because he finished with 53% of the votes. But then, Louceny Camara stole thousands of ballots denying him a first round victory and then proceeded to commit electoral fraud throughout the campaign until he was able to “install” Alpha Conde at Sekoutoureya Palace.

After seeing the following pictures of Diallo’s homecoming yesterday, you will understand why Alpha Conde, in the Spring of 2011, sent Guinean military with a “shoot to kill” order to the airport to get rid of the huge crowd gathered to greet Diallo after a long stay outside the country. People were shot and killed, seriously injured and jailed by the hundreds. But, in the end you can’t hide the truth, can you?

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Guinea Update 6-17: Next March 6-28, Mining Madness, and Guinean Gov’t’s Sept. 28 Massacre Mumbo-Jumbo

July 29, 2011:  Guinean demonstration in front of the White House against Alpha Conde who was visiting Pres. Obama.  The rape of women during the state-sponsored massacre of Sept. 28, 2009, continue to go unaddressed by the Conde administration, one year later.

Opposition March Scheduled for June 28

In spite of a ban by the Conde government on ALL political gatherings, the opposition does not acknowledge the ban because the government cannot “outlaw freedom of speech and assembly.”

It is apparent that the wildly successful May 10 opposition march surprised and worried the government. The only way to prevent the world from seeing another 80,000+ opposition march is to impose the all-out ban.

Since May 10, the opposition made plans to march on a couple of occasions, but it appears that Conde supporters from his coalition the RPG-Arc-en-Ciel planned to counter march at the same time. In addition, there were rumors that the president’s coalition would be supplemented with Donzos (farmers), which assisted government forces in the brutality leveled at opposition supporters during their September 27, 2011 march.

Stay tuned . . .

More Mining Madness

Last week,Guinea Oye! posted an article which revealed new shenanigans in the great underworld of Guinean mining.

Two subsequent articles provide interesting supplemental information on the Guinean government’s sleight of hand:

DAVID GLEASON: Wheeling and dealing in Guinea

Published: 2012/06/08 08:22:01 AM

. . .On the other hand, I have heard associates of Condé’s son, Alpha Mohamed, have been bragging about putting “confiscated mining assets into vehicles they jointly own”.

Back to that $25m loan. The Guinean people have never been told about it, although the deal was signed by Lamine Fofana, the mines minister, and by Kerfalla Yansane, the finance minister. Nor has it appeared in the national budget.

It is all very mysterious.

Read the full article

DAVID GLEASON: Why genuine miners avoid Guinea

Published: 2012/06/14 09:47:46 AM

Guinea is awash with mineral resources, but many mining companies may be discouraged by political developments that leave them baffled.

Read the full article

September 28, 2009 Massacre: Speaking Mumbo-Jumbo

Taking the opportunity of Fatou Bensouda’s swearing-in a few days ago as the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC), the Advocate General of the Guinean Court of Appeals, William Fernandez, spoke about the case of the September 28, 2009, stadium massacre and rape of opposition protesters.

Fatou Bensouda, as the Deputy Chief of the ICC, was the primary investigator of the September 28 massacre. A few months ago, she made a trip to Guinea to let officials know that if they are unable or unwilling to pursue the case, the ICC will take it over.

But, it appears that Mr. Fernandez, in his statement, made the water just murky enough to cover all his bases, without enlightening a soul.   “In this case we operate at our own pace, we have no pressure on us. It’s either one is able to judge, or we let the ICC take up the case. But for now, it’s we who are responsible for this issue.” 

Two years and 8 months since the massacre and not one person has been indicted. The international community is largely responsible for this. It feared the HUGE 40,000-50,000 Guinean army would revolt if members of the military came under indictment for the crimes committed. The case went cold at the ICC and, in the Guinean court system, no one can affirm that the case is being prosecuted, that is, with a straight face.

Justice delayed is justice denied. And, in Guinea, without justice there will be no peace.