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Land Grab in Southeast Guinea May Be a Piece of a Larger Pie

August 11, 2011

In addition to the two articles below, you might want to read up on a company called Farm Lands of Guinea which is a Nevada corporation acquiring farm land in Guinea to “rehabilitate”  in order to put back into production.  Soguipah’s land grab in Southeast Guinea may be a small piece of a much bigger pie.  Please see the following article and stay tuned.

AIM investment in Farm Lands of Guinea

9 August 2011 | 08:18am

StockMarketWire.com – AIM Investments is investing $1m into Farm Lands of Guinea which, in turn, will invest $500,000 into AIM.

FLG is a Nevada corporation, which through its direct subsidiary Farm Lands of Guinea and its indirect 90%-owned subsidiary, Land & Resources (Guinea), is acquiring and consolidating farm land and operations in Guinea and rehabilitating them back into production using modern agricultural techniques and practices.

FLG has prepaid 99 year leases on over 100,000 hectares of arable land.

FLG is raising up to $5m of new funds to prepare and cultivate the leased farmland in Guinea through the issue of 250,000 units at $20.00 apiece.

Scores displaced in Guinea land grab row: News24: Africa: News

Conakry – Over 100 people have sought refuge in a church in south-eastern Guinea after violence broke out in their village over attempts by authorities to forcibly expropriate their land, a spokesman said on Wednesday.

Witnesses and humanitarian organisations said up to 115 people have been housed in the Nzerekore cathedral since the violence broke out on July 28, when they refused to give up their land to the Guinean palm oil and rubber company (Soguipah).

According to witnesses contacted by AFP, Soguipah went into the area in early July with heavy machinery to open roads to the contested land, destroying villagers’ rice fields, coffee and rubber plantations.

On July 28, police officials were dispatched by regional authorities to issue a notice of expropriation to the villagers. Clashes broke out and several farmers and community leaders were arrested.

“Since 1987, the state has been trying to rob us of our land to give it to Soguipah. And since we have no where to go we have been fighting this for three decades,” said Bangaly Conde, a spokesman for the villagers.

“The government must realise that we will not give away our land, which we inherited from our ancestors.”

Fearing fresh violence, many fled the village and sought refuge in the church. Several were injured in the clashes, the witnesses said.

“They came here for protection in the hope that those chasing them won’t profane the house of God,” according to a member of the Catholic Organisation for Human Protection, which is assisting the deplaced.

Neither Soguipah nor any official source contacted by AFP wanted to comment on the matter.

Speaking on French international radio on Tuesday, Communication Minister Dirus Diale Dore said that “everything has returned to normal” in the area.


Conakry – Around 110 Guineans have returned home after hiding out for days in a church as clashes erupted when a palm oil firm backed by security forces tried to seize their land, police said on Thursday.

The last of the group left about a week ago after being persuaded by a priest that they would be safe in their village and on their land, said a police officer in the southeastern forest town of Nzerekore.

The group spent five to six days sheltering in the town’s cathedral after fleeing late last month, he said.

They left their village of Saoro after clashes as they refused to give up their land to palm oil and rubber company Soguipah.

Witnesses said Soguipah went into the area in early July with heavy machinery to open roads to the contested land, destroying villagers’ rice fields, coffee and rubber plantations.

On July 28 police were dispatched to issue a notice of expropriation to the villagers, and violence broke out.

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